Physical activity

A physically active life is an important component in chronic disease prevention

It is important to recognize that physical activity is closely linked to many social determinants of health which become barriers to healthy and active living.  – For example, people living on low-income in sub-standard, precarious housing situation or unsafe neighbourhood  have stresses and priorities which make a focus on physical activity difficult. This can trap people in a feedback loop: being physically inactive increases a person's likelihood of developing chronic disease, which in turn often makes physical activity yet more difficult.

As a society, we need to focus attention to how Canada can change some of the factors that affect many people's ability to lead a physically active lifeand make it easier for all Canadians to be physically active.

Where can you go for more information?

Health Nexus resources

Best Start Resource Centre has an extensive list of resources on nutrition topics for parents and young children.

Have a Ball Together!

Have a Ball Together!
This website offers many downloadable resources created for an awareness campaign on physical activity for parents and caregivers of children 2 to 5 years old (radio clips, video clips, parent resource cards, stickers, posters, etc.). Available in English and French with adaptations available for Aboriginal communities.

Let’s be Healthy Together! (2010)

Let’s be Healthy Together!
A toolkit and training for Ontario’s service providers around the issue of preventing obesity in Ontario’s First Nations, Inuit, and Métis children.

Obesity and the Healthcare Provider. Eating & Moving Well to Prevent & Treat Obesity: Building our Capacity to Support Behavioural Change (PDF, 2009)

Obesity and the Healthcare Provider. Eating & Moving Well to Prevent & Treat Obesity: Building our Capacity to Support Behavioural Change (PDF)
A 19-page annotated catalog of obesity prevention and treatment resources.

Other resources

Documents

Websites